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  • Roles and Functions of the Zoning Board of Appeals: Decision-making & Documentation (Part 3)

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    As Part 3 of this series, this segment provides the “know-how” and tips that will help you make effective decisions when serving on the ZBA, from site visits to public hearings, deliberation, motions and your roles on the board.

    The zoning board of appeals was created as a “safety valve,” in recognition that the zoning ordinance is not able to anticipate how every property might be affected by zoning. With thousands of individual properties, a single zoning regulation cannot possibly be applied uniformly to every property's unique physical characteristics. Learn how the ZBA serves as a safety valve in circumstances where zoning requirements don't fit. Explore how variances approved without sufficient justification can turn the safety valve into a leak, and a leak into a flood.

    This third and final segment in our three-part series provides the “know-how” and tips that will help you make effective decisions when serving on the Zoning Board of Appeals. In addition to examining the intricacies of site visits, public hearings and deliberation, this session also identifies what must be included in motions. Your role in the process and standards to help focus your preparation efforts are also incorporated into this session.

    NOTE: To get the most of out of this series, MTA recommends that you participate in part one The Basics and part two  Variances prior to participating part three Decision-making & Documentation

    Thank you to Michigan Township Participating Plan for helping to underwrite the cost of this program. For more information, visit www.theparplan.com

    Steve Langworthy

    Director of Land Use & Long Range Planning, Dublin, Ohio

    Steve Langworth received a Masters of Urban Planning from the University of Michigan and spent 6 years as a planning director and zoning administrator for the city of Kentwood, Michigan (among others), and over 20 years as a consulting planner, most recently with LSL Planning in Grand Rapids.

    Steve has authored numerous Master Plans, Zoning Ordinances, and special studies for communities of all sizes and characteristics. He is a frequent MTA presenter and the principal author of MTA’s Township Guide to Planning and Zoning and Township Planning & Zoning Decision-making Handbook.

  • Roles and Functions of the Zoning Board of Appeals: The Basics (Part 1)

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    As part one of a three-part series, The Basics explores the delicate balancing act between property rights and public interest along with the impact zoning relationships have on ordinances. Learn more about voting requirements, as well as the duties and responsibilities of the Zoning Board of Appeals. Zoning ordinance interpretations will also be discussed.

    The zoning board of appeals was created as a “safety valve,” in recognition that the zoning ordinance is not able to anticipate how every property might be affected by zoning. With thousands of individual properties, a single zoning regulation cannot possibly be applied uniformly to every property's unique physical characteristics. Learn how the ZBA serves as a safety valve in circumstances where zoning requirements don't fit. Explore how variances approved without sufficient justification can turn the safety valve into a leak, and a leak into a flood.

    As part one of a three-part series, The Basics explores the delicate balancing act between property rights and public interest along with the impact zoning relationships have on ordinances. Learn more about voting requirements, as well as the duties and responsibilities of the Zoning Board of Appeals. Zoning ordinance interpretations will also be discussed.

    NOTE: To get the most of out of this series, MTA recommends that you participate in part two Variances and part three Decision-making & Documentation to gain a full understanding of the topic. 

    Thank you to Michigan Township Participating Plan for helping to underwrite the cost of this program. For more information, visit www.theparplan.com

    Steve Langworthy

    Director of Land Use & Long Range Planning, Dublin, Ohio

    Steve Langworth received a Masters of Urban Planning from the University of Michigan and spent 6 years as a planning director and zoning administrator for the city of Kentwood, Michigan (among others), and over 20 years as a consulting planner, most recently with LSL Planning in Grand Rapids.

    Steve has authored numerous Master Plans, Zoning Ordinances, and special studies for communities of all sizes and characteristics. He is a frequent MTA presenter and the principal author of MTA’s Township Guide to Planning and Zoning and Township Planning & Zoning Decision-making Handbook.

  • Roles and Functions of the Zoning Board of Appeals: Variances (Part 2)

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    In part two of this three-part series, you will discover the “ins and outs” of variances, including identifying strategies and considerations when hearing variance requests and decision standards that will hold up in court. Find out more about non-use and use variances and review the top 10 incorrect reasons variances are granted.

    The zoning board of appeals was created as a “safety valve,” in recognition that the zoning ordinance is not able to anticipate how every property might be affected by zoning. With thousands of individual properties, a single zoning regulation cannot possibly be applied uniformly to every property's unique physical characteristics. Learn how the ZBA serves as a safety valve in circumstances where zoning requirements don't fit. Explore how variances approved without sufficient justification can turn the safety valve into a leak, and a leak into a flood.

    In part two of this three-part series, you will discover the “ins and outs” of variances, including identifying strategies and considerations when hearing variance requests and decision standards that will hold up in court. Find out more about non-use and use variances and review the top 10 incorrect reasons variances are granted.

    NOTE: To get the most of out of this series, MTA recommends that you participate in part one, The Basics, before completing this session. After completing part two, continue the learning process by participating in Decision-making & Documentation—the final session in our ZBA series.

    Thank you to Michigan Township Participating Plan for helping to underwrite the cost of this program. For more information, visit www.theparplan.com

  • Special Assessment Procedures

    Contains 2 Component(s)

    This two-part series will identify the ins and outs of raising money from those who benefit without burdening the general public.

    The process of specially assessing property for costs of a project can be both confusing and challenging. This two-part series will identify the ins and outs of raising money from those who benefit without burdening the general public. Examine the procedures and methods of using township special assessment laws to generate money for projects, such as streets, sidewalks, sewers, bike paths and emergency services. Review the special assessment process from start to finish, including the petition process, board resolutions, notice and public hearing requirements, confirmation of the assessment roll, appeals, and options for financing projects.

    Steve Mann

    Attorney

    Steve Mann is an attorney with Miller, Canfield, Paddock and Stone, PLC. He practices in the area of municipal finance, including municipal bonds, special assessments, tax increment finance, economic development, Brownfield redevelopment, and intergovernmental transactions.

    Steve currently serves his community as a trustee for Plymouth Charter Township in Wayne County and previously served a term as township supervisor.

  • Spending Public Money

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    In this webcast, you’ll discover the general guidelines and specific examples of lawful and unlawful expenditures determined by statute, case law.

    Townships need statutory authority to spend public money. If a law says or implies that a township may spend public money on an activity, then it is a lawful expenditure (as long as you get equal value or better in return). But if you can’t point to a statute that authorizes townships to spend money on a particular activity, then it’s an unlawful expenditure.  In this webcast, you’ll discover the general guidelines and specific examples of lawful and unlawful expenditures determined by statute, case law. 

    Thank you to C2AE for helping underwrite the cost of this program. For more information, visit c2ae.com.

    Catherine Mullhaupt

    Staff Attorney, Member Information Services

    Catherine Mullhaupt

    Catherine joined MTA in 1991, working in the Education Department before joining Member Information Services in 2000. She was admitted to the State Bar of Michigan in 2006 and is currently the MTA Staff Attorney.

  • Tax Collecting: Accounting, Disbursement and Settlement (Part 4)

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    This segment, part 4 of our 5-part "Tax Collection" series, delves into accepting and recording payments, recording disbursements, distribution deadlines and penalties, and settlement with the county.

    This segment, part 4 of our 5-part "Tax Collection" series, delves into accepting and recording payments, recording disbursements, distribution deadlines and penalties, and settlement with the county.

    Once you’ve mastered Getting Started – Parts 1 & 2Bill Preparation, Summer and Winter Taxes (Part 3), and this segment on Accounting, Disbursement and Settlement, you won’t want to miss the remaining segment, going in-depth on delinquent personal property tax.

    Jim Beelen

    Former MTA Member Information Services Liaison

    MTA Member Information Liaison Jim Beelen joined MTA in October 2008 from Allendale Charter Township in Ottawa County where he served on the township board for 30 years. The last 12 years Jim was the Supervisor. For 18 years prior to that, Jim served as the township treasurer.

    During his time at MTA, Jim provided township officials and employees with information and resources regarding the day-to-day functions of township government. He also developed MIS Department resource materials, and presented workshop and Conference sessions. Jim retired in 2015 and now enjoys fishing and visiting his many grandchildren.

  • Tax Collecting: Bill Preparation, Summer and Winter Taxes (Part 3)

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    In part 3 of our Tax Collecting series, this segment delves into summer taxes, deferments, SET, winter taxes and PILT.

    Collecting and distributing taxes is a highly visible and sometimes controversial township function that involves handling large sums of money. Review the tax collection process, including the township treasurer’s statutory duties, in this five segment webcast series on tax collection.

    This segment (Part 3) delves into summer taxes, deferments, SET, winter taxes and PILT. Once you’ve mastered Getting Started – Parts 1 & 2, and this segment on Bill Preparation, Summer and Winter Taxes, you won’t want to miss the remaining segments on accounting, disbursement and settlement; and delinquent personal property tax.

  • Tax Collecting: Delinquent Personal Property Tax (Part 5)

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    This segment is the final in our tax collection series and delves into what you need to know about collecting delinquent personal property tax.

    Collecting and distributing taxes is a highly visible and sometimes controversial township function that involves handling large sums of money. Review the tax collection process, including the township treasurer’s statutory duties, in this five segment webcast series on tax collection.

    This segment is the final in our tax collection series and delves into what you need to know about collecting delinquent personal property tax.

    Don't miss the other segments in our series on Tax Collection which include: Getting Started – Parts 1 & 2Bill Preparation, Summer and Winter Taxes, and Accounting, Disbursement and Settlement.


    Jim Beelen

    Former MTA Member Information Services Liaison

    MTA Member Information Liaison Jim Beelen joined MTA in October 2008 from Allendale Charter Township in Ottawa County where he served on the township board for 30 years. The last 12 years Jim was the Supervisor. For 18 years prior to that, Jim served as the township treasurer.

    During his time at MTA, Jim provided township officials and employees with information and resources regarding the day-to-day functions of township government. He also developed MIS Department resource materials, and presented workshop and Conference sessions. Jim retired in 2015 and now enjoys fishing and visiting his many grandchildren.

  • Tax Collecting: Getting Started (Part 1)

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    In part one of this series, review the tax collection process, from the assessment roll to settlement with the county treasurer. Part 1 of a 5-part series.

    Collecting and distributing taxes is a highly visible and sometimes controversial township function that involves handling large sums of money. Review the tax collection process, including the township treasurer’s statutory duties, in this five segment webcast series on tax collection.

    Getting Started - Part 1 will explore the basic tax collection process—from the assessment roll to settlement with the county treasurer. Examine the tax calendar and the duties involved at each point during the collection process.

    Once you’ve mastered Getting Started – Part 1, you won’t want to miss Part 2; then consider the remaining segments on bill preparation, summer and winter taxes; accounting, disbursement and settlement; and delinquent personal property tax.

    Jim Beelen

    Former MTA Member Information Services Liaison

    MTA Member Information Liaison Jim Beelen joined MTA in October 2008 from Allendale Charter Township in Ottawa County where he served on the township board for 30 years. The last 12 years Jim was the Supervisor. For 18 years prior to that, Jim served as the township treasurer.

    During his time at MTA, Jim provided township officials and employees with information and resources regarding the day-to-day functions of township government. He also developed MIS Department resource materials, and presented workshop and Conference sessions. Jim retired in 2015 and now enjoys fishing and visiting his many grandchildren.

  • Tax Collecting: Getting Started (Part 2)

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Continue to explore tax collecting process like identifying deadlines, statutory procedures, practical tips and resources for the tax cycle. Part 2 of a 5 part series.

    Collecting and distributing taxes is a highly visible and sometimes controversial township function that involves handling large sums of money. Review the tax collection process, including the township treasurer’s statutory duties, in this five segment webcast series on tax collection.

    Getting Started - Part 2 continues to explore the basic tax collection process—from the assessment roll to settlement with the county treasurer. Identify deadlines, statutory procedures, practical tips and resources for the tax cycle.

     Once you’ve mastered Getting Started – Parts 1 & 2, you won’t want to miss the remaining segments on bill preparation, summer and winter taxes; accounting, disbursement and settlement; and delinquent personal property tax.

    Jim Beelen

    Former MTA Member Information Services Liaison

    MTA Member Information Liaison Jim Beelen joined MTA in October 2008 from Allendale Charter Township in Ottawa County where he served on the township board for 30 years. The last 12 years Jim was the Supervisor. For 18 years prior to that, Jim served as the township treasurer.

    During his time at MTA, Jim provided township officials and employees with information and resources regarding the day-to-day functions of township government. He also developed MIS Department resource materials, and presented workshop and Conference sessions. Jim retired in 2015 and now enjoys fishing and visiting his many grandchildren.